Across the Border

Auld Reekie

The centuries of cobbled stone are steeped in ancient sweat
Where the vagabonds and Gentry ruled where the old and new towns met
The Mound that links the old and new the gateway to St Giles
Is flanked by gardens East & West that lead to the Royal Mile

The Firth of Forth lies to the north the Pentlands to the South
The Water of Leith flows through the town on its journey to the mouth
The town sits proud on glacial rock views North, South, East & West
Where old and new merge seamlessly and proudly fly the crest

The Castle on the hill the palace in the park
Scott monument on Princess Street shines brightly in the dark
The gun that fires at one o’clock from the Castle rock
Reminds the town of ancient times when ships used it as a clock

The docks at Leith were a thriving hub with ships berthed side by side
The port is now a social place no more a class divide
With bonded warehouses turned into flats with shops & bars & clubs
The Dockers life has passed away just like the smoke filled pubs

The Castle on the hill the palace in the park
Scott monument on Princess Street shines brightly in the dark
The gun that fires at one o’clock from the Castle rock
Reminds the town of ancient times when ships used it as a clock

The fishing port of Newhaven was a bustling hub of toil
Where the haddock and the herring were the fishermen’s spoil
The fishwives in their muslin caps, stripped petticoats and scarf
Would load the fish onto their backs in creels stacked on the wharf

With creels packed full and on their back the fishwives sold the catch
Through cobbled streets and smoke filled lanes they trudged their weary patch
They cried the call “fresh fish for sale just landed this AM
No going back till the last fish gone to start it all again

The Castle on the hill the palace in the park
Scott monument on Princess Street shines brightly in the dark
The gun that fires at one o’clock from the Castle rock
Reminds the town of ancient times when ships used it as a clock

(Jameson/Rowley)